There is still no definitive cause for CSF or chronic fatigue syndrome, which is also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis. As many as 2.5 million Americans in many American cities like Salt Lake City and New York are dealing with the illness based on the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) statistics.

An Ongoing Series of Questions

A definitive cause for the condition has not yet been ascertained and a clear diagnostic profile has not been established. Diagnosis of CSF is not based on laboratory test results corroborated by physical examination and observation. Instead, doctors seek to rule out similar conditions before giving a diagnosis of CSF. Moreover, there is no treatment protocol known to be effective in providing respite and recovery. Often, doctors approach the problem by treating symptoms and preventing secondary complications from the primary manifestations of the disease.

Long-term Fatigue

Sufferers of CSF experience pain with overwhelming fatigue, decreasing their capacity to be productive and to participate in activities of daily living. Other associated symptoms include impaired concentration, dizziness, and extended periods of depression. People diagnosed with chronic fatigue in Salt Lake City can take solace in the fact that the number of studies on CSF seeking to find answers is many and still growing in number.

CSF and Thyroid Insufficiency

What have these studies determined so far? Recent and ongoing research shows an association between the symptoms of CSF and low thyroid hormone levels in the bloodstream. There is a popular theory that CSF may be caused by a low activity of hormones released by the thyroid gland without the gland itself being affected.

Common Ground

Unexplained chronic lethargy, despite adequate rest and sleep, affects many people today. They are unable to earn a livelihood and find it difficult to sustain relationships. They become predisposed to anxiety and depression. They choose isolation, which only worsens their condition.

The lethargy and fatigue characterizing the daily existence of persons with myalgic encephalomyelitis are similar to the key symptoms of hypothyroidism. The latter is a well-studied and common endocrinological condition. The thyroid gland is the body’s “gas pedal.” Due to insufficient production of thyroid hormones, numerous bodily functions are affected, including metabolism and energy consumption. The association, as determined by some key studies, lie in overlapping physiological characteristics shared by the two conditions.

Normal Thyroid Function inCSF

Man having his Thyroid being checked by a doctor

If someone in the family is suspected of having CSF, the doctor will try to give a diagnosis by ordering several tests, aside from tests for thyroid function. Despite the increasingly close association with low thyroid hormones, tests on the thyroid gland come out negative. Also, CSF is not associated with primary thyroid disease since the expected response to a lowered thyroid function is not present in the afflicted.

There is no recognized medical treatment for CSF or myalgic encephalomyelitis, and the insufficient knowledge on the causation and pathophysiology of the disease is alarming. It is a debilitating disease, but the answers are still forthcoming. Millions of people are suffering not only in the United States but also in many parts of the world.

Do you know anyone with symptoms of CSF who needs help?